Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2017, Page: 94-98
Antithesis “Life – Death” in the Novel by John Braine “Room at the Top”
Yuliya Alexandrovna Kutsevich, Philological Department, Smolensk State University, Smolensk, Russia
Elena Evgenievna Markadeeva, Philological Department, Smolensk State University, Smolensk, Russia
Received: Sep. 24, 2017;       Accepted: Oct. 18, 2017;       Published: Nov. 22, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.ellc.20170206.11      View  1315      Downloads  84
Abstract
The article studies the images of two towns, Warley and Dufton, in the famous novel by John Braine “Room at the Top” (1957). The authors of the article compare the images in question and find out the stylistic devices (metaphor, detachment, alliteration, polysyndeton, etc) that enabled John Braine to create two opposite literary images related to each other through the antithesis “life − death”, in which, in the hero’s view, the notion of life is associated with Warley, whereas the notion of death is implied by Dufton.
Keywords
Stylistic Device, John Braine, Room at the Top, Literary Image, Antithesis “Life − Death”
To cite this article
Yuliya Alexandrovna Kutsevich, Elena Evgenievna Markadeeva, Antithesis “Life – Death” in the Novel by John Braine “Room at the Top”, English Language, Literature & Culture. Vol. 2, No. 6, 2017, pp. 94-98. doi: 10.11648/j.ellc.20170206.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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